Events

Maine Dairy Seminar

Maine Dairy Seminar Tuesday, March 14, 2017 Waterville Elks Lodge Sponsored by the Maine Dairy Industry Association, registration for this event is free for dairy farmers and includes refreshments and lunch. Advanced Registration by mail, email, phone or fax must be received by Monday, March 6, 2017. Registration after this date or at the door will be $25. Guest Speaker is Tom Kilcer of Kinderhook, NY, a private consultant conducting research on forages crops and plant nutrition in partnerships with both university and private industry. His topic for this event is: “Forage Strategies for Northeast Dairy Farms”. Dr. Juan Romero, Assistant Professor of Animal Science with the University of Maine School of Food and Agriculture, will also speak about his Enzyme and Silage Inoculant Research. The Seminar also includes the MDIA Annual Meeting, Maine Dairy Shrine Award, and Industry Updates. For more information, or to register, contact Melissa Libby at melissa.libby1@maine.edu or 1-800-287-7170, or Fax (207)...

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October is Cheese Month!

October is Cheese Month!

According to the American Cheese Society, October is American Cheese Month – “a celebration of North America’s delicious and diverse cheeses, and the farmers, cheesemakers, retailers, cheesemongers and chefs who bring them to your table.” You won’t find more delicious cheeses or more amazing dairy farmers and cheesemakers than right here in Maine. We also have some pretty cool local-loving retailers and talented chefs and cheesemongers, and October is definitely the month to celebrate those folks and sample some to-die-for cheeses. The Maine Cheese Guild presents its Open Creamery Day 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 9. They have a map of 15 participating cheesemakers. You’ll have the opportunity to see how some of these great cheeses are made and will undoubtedly have a chance to taste some of them! And some cheesemakers are also dairy farmers, so you’ll get to meet the critters who contribute the delicious milk for these concoctions. Read a brief Q&A at the bottom of this page with cheesemaker Sarah Wiederkehr of Winter Hill Farm in Freeport about why she participates in events like Open Creamery Day, of which cheeses she is most proud, and why cheesemaking is so magical, yet scientific. Cabot Creamery will have Open Farm Sunday at four of its Maine farms also on the 9th – Ferland Farm in Poland, Kreb’s Organic Dairy Farm in Starks, Pleasantville Farm in Warren, and the University of Maine’s Witter Farm in Old Town. Each farm has activities planned for visitors 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and there will also be plenty of opportunities to see the cows and sample the “World’s Best Cheddar”. While it’s true that Cabot cheese is made in Vermont, nearly 1/3 of Maine’s dairy farms belong to the Cabot Co-op. “As a cooperative, our farm families own the business, so when people purchase Cabot products they are directly supporting farmers in their local communities,” said Cabot Communications Manager Nate Formalarie. “Farms are opening their doors to say thank you, show gratitude for community support, and give people a chance to see where Cabot cheese comes from.” Billie Jo Krebs echoes that same sentiment when asked why her family takes the time from their busy schedule to invite the community to their farm. In fact, the family does multiple events with the community, Boy Scout troops and school groups throughout the year. “It gives people a chance to learn more about farming and where their food comes from,” she says. If you won’t be able to visit a farm, Cabot will have a live farm tour on its Faceboook page at 11 a.m. that day. Another exciting offering from the Maine Cheese Guild this month is the Maine Cheese Festival 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 16 at Savage Oakes Vineyard and Winery in Union. The event is described as “an opportunity to talk, taste, learn about  and purchase Maine-made cheese, learn about cheesemaking, and celebrate the robust artisanal cheesemaking movement in Maine.” About 20 cheesemakers from around the state are signed on to have cheese at the event, including Amy Rowbottom of Crooked Face Creamery in Norridgewock (and you won’t want to miss her ricotta or smoked Gouda-style cheeses). “I’m thrilled to be part of the event and so grateful to the Guild members who pulled this incredible event together despite their busy summer schedules,” Rowbottom said. “Maine cheese is such an exciting culture to be a part of – the growth, local support and opportunities are constantly evolving. It’s like being in the right place at the right time, and this event is a celebration of that.” While the Maine cheeses are a definite draw, the festival will offer much more, including wine tasting, baked goods...

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Give a Tri a Try

Give a Tri a Try

By Brittney Ginn, dairy farmer’s daughter and Moo Squad sponsored athlete A Triathlon is tricky because it’s not just one sport you have to work on. It’s three! Swim,bike and then run. Swimming is the most challenging task because so many factors to the weather can affect how you do. My first triathlon, the water was very chilly, and the wind was blowing, and not to forget the crisp September morning air! This all makes for a very tense athlete. Some people will use a triathlon suit (a one or two piece suit that is breathable, sleeveless and has a biking shorts type bottom) AND a wet suit (can be any combination – full body, sleeveless, short, but it keeps you warmer than a triathlon suit and is more buoyant). The wet suit makes me feel restricted and stresses me out more than it’s worth. So I always just wear my triathlon suit, which is basically a fancy bathing suit with shorts that have a little bit of padding for your bike ride. So, once you’re out of the water, you rush to dry off your feet and as much of your body as you can. You quickly get your shoes on, then your helmet, and follow all the strict rules about not mounting your bike until you reach the line. Now, you’re off onto your bike ride – the second part of a triathlon. I really like the bike ride portion of the Lake George Triathlon in the Skowhegan area because it’s beautiful rolling countryside and lots of great views. At the beginning, the bike ride is very cold because you have a wet triathlon suit at 59° in the middle of September and you’re going about 15 mph. As you finish up the last mile of the bike ride, you must again remember and follow all the rules while trying to transition to the next portion of the race – don’t take your helmet off until you’re off your bike! As if your legs don’t burn enough already, you have to run – 3.5 miles of hills, and your legs feel like they weigh 1,000 pounds. You struggle through this and you feel like quitting so many times. As the temperature rises along with the sun, you’re so hot from the sun beating on you, and your body is chafed in every possible way. This is why it’s very important to train for these events. And hydrate and fuel your muscles with the proper protein. I try to do a brick workout at least once or twice a week. A brick workout is a bike ride and then run right after. The term comes from your legs feel like bricks when you get off your bike and start running. The other three days a week I focus on either running or swimming or biking alone. I always finish with a yummy glass of chocolate milk or Greek yogurt with granola. Looking forward to this year’s Lake George triathlon with the Moo Squad.* Unfortunately, shortly after this post was written, Brittney learned she would be unable to compete in the triathlon on Sept. 11, but Moo Squad teammates James Delorie, Emilee Robertson and Jennifer Jones will all be...

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Maine Dairy Night at the Sea Dogs

Maine Dairy Night at the Sea Dogs

Come join us for an evening filled with baseball, fun giveaways, dairy farmers and princesses (dairy princesses of course) when the Portland Sea Dogs host Maine Dairy Night on Friday, June 10, at Hadlock Field. Game starts at 7 p.m., and the first 1,000 fans through the gate receive a commemorative pennant. For tickets click here....

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2016 Events

2016 Events

  Maine Dairy Night at the Portland Sea Dogs   Friday, June 10 Come join us for an evening filled with baseball, fun giveaways, dairy farmers and princesses (dairy princesses of course) when the Portland Sea Dogs host Maine Dairy Night on Friday, June 10, at Hadlock Field. Game starts at 7 p.m., and the first 1,000 fans through the gate receive a commemorative pennant. For tickets click here. Open Farm Day  Sunday, July 24 Farms across the state welcome visitors to have a closer look at where their food comes from. Check the link above for participating farms in your area.   Maine Farm Days,  Wednesday and Thursday, August 24-25, Clinton Misty Meadows Farm hosts this two-day farming extravaganza with tons of activities for children and families, contests, wagon rides around the dairy farm, vendors and seminars for farmers.      ...

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Summer Fun on the Farm

Summer Fun on the Farm

Summer vacation is under way all over the state, but that’s no reason to stop learning. Summer is the perfect time to visit a dairy farm, partake in an on-the-farm meal, take advantage of Open Farm Day and Maine Farm Days, or even go to farm camp! Hart to Hart Farm in Albion is a diversified dairy farm that offers several sessions of summer camp for children who want to learn about the day to day life on a farm. There are programs for all ages – some give a great overview, while others are for older children and really start to delve into sustainable farming practices or traditional skills. There’s even a Critters and Crafts program in which children are paired with their own animal and the crafts are farm and nature inspired.  Hart to Hart also has one day programs for the entire family, and this year, they even added a farm camp retreat program for adults! Visit hart2hartfarm.org for a schedule and more information.   Smiling Hill Farm in Westbrook is a working dairy farm and also has a barnyard full of friendly critters. They are open daily, and they promise the chores are never ending if you want to lend a hand. Plus they process and bottle their own milk AND make cheese and ice cream, so you can see dairy products from start to finish and do a little taste testing. Visit smilinghill.com for more information.   Educational farms like Wolfe’s Neck Farm in Freeport and Pineland Farms in New Gloucester often have day programs for the entire family to come and learn together. Wolfe’s Neck has Family Barnyard Programs Saturday and Sundays through the end of August. Morning sessions are 10 a.m. to Noon, and afternoon sessions are 1-3 p.m. They also offer farm-related summer camps for several age groups. Pineland’s dairy barn is open to visitors and tours as is the creamery next door, and you won’t want to leave without some of their cheese curds. They have events like Family Farmyard Fun on June 17 and 25 and Friday on the Farm (10-11:30) each week, and Ice Cream Making is on June 23. Both farms also have on-farm meal events that feature food from their own farms as well as other Maine farms. Visit wolfesneckfarm.org   and pinelandfarms.org/what-to-do/ for schedules and offerings.   Maine Open Farm Sunday is on July 26 this year. More than 85 farms across the state welcome families to come tour the operation or see demonstrations. Visit getrealmaine.com for a list of participating farms. Harris Farm, another diversified farm, in Dayton, has Lunch on the Land that day, featuring corn, vegetable platters, burgers, homemade desserts and milk straight from the farm. They also offer a free educational hayride tour of the farm that day.   Maine Farm Days is Wednesday and Thursday, August 26-27, at Misty Meadows Farm, a dairy farm, in Clinton. The event includes activities for both farmers and non-farmers alike.  While it’s a chance for farmers to connect with Agri-business owners and check over some of the new equipment, there are also wagon tours, a children’s learning center, petting farm, craft tent, milking contest, farmers market and educational speakers and presentations.  Contestants for the Maine Dairy Princess contest will be there as well as a number of farmers from all different fields (pun intended) who are always happy to answer farm-related questions for the general public. And you don’t have to be a farmer to enter the Whoopie Pie or Pie Baking Contests. The event is open to everyone and admission is free.   Open Creamery Day is...

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