Schools

Recipes for the 2017-18 School Year

Recipes for the 2017-18 School Year

New ways to help make school meals better than ever. On-trend, fun and tasty school meal recipes are a great way to help ensure every student is fueled and ready to learn. The recipes provide new ways to meet school meal nutrition guidelines. Each includes fat-free Greek yogurt and all help to meet grain, fruit and vegetable servings, too. The recipes are quick-scratch, easy to prepare, designed to help meet school cost restraints, and are suitable for cafeteria service, grab-n-go and Breakfast in the Classroom. These are also suitable for breakfast, lunch, dinner and/or snacks. Recipes are brought to you by McCormick, Sodexo, the National Dairy Council and Dannon.   Sriracha_Chicken_SaladWrap   Spiced_Yogurt_Muffins   Ranch_Veggie_Pattie   Peaches_N_Cream_Overnight_Oats   Greek_Yogurt_Banana_Muffins   Fruity_Yogurt_Popsicles   Creamy_Herb_Yogurt_Dressing   Creamy_Arroz_ConPollo   Chipotle_BBQ_3Bean_Salad   Baked_Caribrrean_Lime_FishSticks   Asian_Slaw  ...

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Fuel Up to Play 60 Contest Rules

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN  Eligibility: Students in grades K-12 who reside in Maine are eligible. Employees of National Dairy Council OR Maine Dairy & Nutrition Council/Maine Dairy Promotion Board, NFL Entities (as defined below), their respective parents, affiliates, subsidiaries, advertising or promotion agencies or other individuals engaged in the development, production, or distribution of promotion materials and persons who are immediate family or who reside in the same household as persons in the preceding categories are not eligible. Void where prohibited. Contest Period: Contest runs from August 1, 2017 to July 31, 2018.  Winners will be notified following monthly drawings on the first of each month. Prize: Prizes will vary.  Odds of winning depend on the number of valid entries received. No cash or other substitution may be made, except by Sponsors in the event that a prize (or part thereof) cannot be awarded, in which case Sponsors will at their sole discretion award a prize (or part thereof) of equal or greater value.  Taxes are the sole responsibility of the winners. Winner understands that he/she must claim a prize award on their tax return that is valued at $600.00 or greater.  How to Enter and Win: Submit your photo along with your name, grade and school by email to catherine@drinkmainemilk.org. Photos should be of you participating in a physical activity or healthy eating. Entrants will have their name put in a monthly drawing.  Indemnification: By entering, participants agree to release, discharge, and hold harmless, Dairy Management Inc., Maine Dairy & Nutrition Council, Maine Dairy Promotion Board, University of Maine at Orono or the Orono Black Bears, the NFL Entities (as defined below), NFL Players Association, their respective parents, affiliates, subsidiaries, advertising or promotion agencies or other individuals engaged in the development or production, from all claims or damages arising out of participation in both this offer and/or contest and/or acceptance of any prize or offer. Subject to applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.  Winners List: To receive a list of winners, mail a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Maine Dairy & Nutrition Council, 333 Cony Road, Augusta, ME 04330. Sponsor: Maine Diary & Nutrition Council/Maine Dairy Promotion Board. The National Football League, its member professional football clubs, NFL Ventures, Inc., NFL Ventures, L.P., NFL Properties LLC, NFL Enterprises LLC and each of their respective subsidiaries, affiliates, owners, shareholders, officers, directors, agents, representatives and employees (collectively, the “NFL Entities”) will have no liability or responsibility for any claim arising in connection with participation in this sweepstakes or any prize awarded.  The NFL Entities have not offered or sponsored this sweepstakes in any way.  © 2017 National Dairy Council®. Fuel Up is a service mark of National Dairy...

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Duron Harmon encourages students to take the time for breakfast and exercise

Duron Harmon encourages students to take the time for breakfast and exercise

Put down the cell phones and take the time to eat breakfast and be active each day, New England Patriots’ free safety Duron Harmon told a crowded auditorium of Westbrook High School students on Thursday, March 30. “Eating breakfast in the morning takes 10, 15 minutes. Exercising takes an hour. All we got to do is put down our cell phones and do it,” he said as the crowd erupted into applause. Harmon was at the school as part of a Fuel Up to Play 60 assembly, celebrating school breakfast and the achievements of Angelica Johns, a freshman at WHS and the state ambassador for the Fuel Up to Play 60 program in Maine. Funded by dairy farmers across the nation, Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program launched by National Dairy Council and NFL, in collaboration with the USDA, to help encourage youth to lead healthier lives and empower them to make a difference within their school’s wellness environment. It has given Johns and fellow WHS student Madison Damon, who was the state ambassador two years ago, the opportunity to travel to regional and national leadership summits and meet like-minded students from across the country. Damon also recently received a $7,500 SAP Bill McDermott College Scholarship thanks to her involvement with Fuel Up to Play 60. This year, Johns championed for a breakfast cart at the school to give students a second chance at grabbing a healthy breakfast in the morning if they did not choose to eat in the cafeteria when they first arrived at the school.   Harmon referenced research that has shown that students are more focused and perform better in school when fueled by a healthy breakfast in the morning, even if it’s “just a banana and yogurt.” “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day,” he said. “It gives you energy to accomplish the things you want to do, to improve academic performance and test scores.” He also stressed the importance of being active for a minimum of 60 minutes each day, not only to stay in shape but as a way to build confidence and self esteem. “We live in a world that wants to tear everybody down. I love social media; I’m on social media, but if you ever look at the things that are going on in social media and how people are always clowning people, want to just talk down to them, that’s the world we live in,” he said. “You’re going to be in a world, where you have your goals and you have your dreams and not everybody is going to see your vision, and at the same time, they are going to try to tear it down. If you could do something like physical activity that could build your confidence up so that you have the confidence to stand up to them and let them know, ‘You are not going to knock down my dream. You’re not going to tell me I can’t do this. I’m going to do whatever I want to.’”     Harmon said that exercise or physical activity didn’t mean they have to go to the gym to work out each day. It could be as simple as playing a pickup game of basketball with friends, throwing a Frisbee or going for a run or a walk. He added that physical activity is also a stress reliever, and high school students can experience a great deal of stress. By taking the time to eat breakfast, which would allow students to better learn and continue to...

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Starting the Day on the Right Foot with Breakfast

Starting the Day on the Right Foot with Breakfast

By Ashley Sears, Esquire, Sponsored Moo Squad athlete Call me crazy, but nothing beats a wholesome, healthy breakfast to start the day.  I like to think of sleep as my time travel to breakfast, and without a solid breakfast, hanger is a real life emotion for me.  My family and friends know that I used to be a “leftovers for breakfast” kind of kid.  It wasn’t unusual to see shepherd’s pie or spaghetti on my plate in the morning before school (not the healthiest options, I know). In high school, I started changing my eating habits and having eggs, toast, and jam. In college, my eating habits were somewhat less disciplined and I would often have sugary cereal or a granola bar. Once I got to law school and realized how important a complete breakfast was to stay focused through late night classes and studying, I took the time to meal prep and have breakfast ready for class the next morning. Overnight oats, yogurt parfaits, and smoothies became my go-to meals. Not only did this benefit me in the classroom, it contributed to my running and overall health. This week, March 6-10, marks National School Breakfast Week. Additionally, throughout the month of March, we recognize and celebrate National Nutrition Month.  This provides an opportunity to talk about healthy lifestyle choices, recipes that taste good and are good for you, and how we can eat well while still leading hectic and busy lives. The National School Breakfast Week program was founded in 1989 through the collaborative efforts of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the School Nutrition Association. The program provides over 13 million breakfast meals to school-aged children, regardless of economic background, helping students to be alert and productive during the school day. This year’s theme for National School Breakfast Week is “Take the School Breakfast Challenge,” which encourages students, parents, and teachers to start their morning with a healthy breakfast. Often short on time and trying to complete a million tasks before the school day starts, taking time the night before to prepare breakfast is a great option to save time and ensure that you aren’t skipping breakfast the next day.  Incorporating dairy products into breakfast is also a surefire way to get the necessary protein, calcium, and vitamins you need to stay focused, energized, and full until lunch. Here are a few of my favorite breakfast recipes, that can be made ahead of time and provide a bounty of protein, vitamins, and flavor! Wild Blueberry Smoothie: ½ cup milk 1 scoop vanilla protein powder ½ cup vanilla or plain yogurt ½ cup frozen wild blueberries 1 tsp. cinnamon Handful of ice cubes Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender.  Blend until desired consistency.  Place in freezer overnight and let thaw in morning.  Enjoy on your way to work or school. Maple Overnight Oats: ½ cup steel cut oats ½ cup milk ½ scoop vanilla protein powder 1 T pure maple syrup ½ cup chopped apples 1 tsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. nutmeg 1 T chopped walnuts or almonds Bring oats and milk to a boil on the stove.  Stir in protein powder, maple syrup, spices, and chopped apples.  Place in a Ball Mason jar or microwave safe container and sprinkle nuts on top.  Store in fridge and reheat in microwave for one minute in the morning. Patriotic Parfait: ¾ cup vanilla or plain yogurt ¼ cup blueberries ¼ cup diced strawberries ¼ cup raspberries ¼ cup granola of choice (I love GrandyOats Wild Blueberry granola; check for sugar amounts on granola, as some can contain a...

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Maine FUTP60 students receive grants to transform their schools

Maine FUTP60 students receive grants to transform their schools

We are always excited to see how active Maine students are in Fuel Up to Play 60, and it’s fantastic to see Maine schools and students rewarded (beyond improved school wellness) for their involvement, whether through grants, scholarships, prizes, or opportunities to travel and attend leadership events. Recently, two more students were rewarded with grants to transform fitness within their schools. Fuel Up to Play 60 student ambassadors Tyr Ronco of Ridge View Community School in Dexter and Boden Gould of Bath Middle School each received up to $1,000 from the Presidential Youth Fitness Program School Transformation Contest, a national grant competition that rewarded 100 students. Tyr and his peers in the school’s Wellness Program would like to see year-round opportunities for fitness, not just within Ridge View, but for the entire community. The grant money will be used rebuild trails around the school to be used for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing in the winter and running and hiking in the warmer months. They also would like to update the small fitness center at the school and introduce lacrosse as a possible after school club. “The grant money will increase the activities that are available to the students and community, help kids get more active, promote healthy life habits, and make our community a better place to live and play in,” Tyr wrote. In his application, Boden said his school had the basic essentials for physical education but that the Fuel Up to Play 60 team and the school’s gym teacher would like to see other options available to students outside the mainstream gym equipment in hopes of making physical activity fun for more students. He requested funds for things like pogo sticks and four way tug of war ropes. He also asked for new goalie equipment for the school’s large floor hockey tournaments. “I would like to have new floor hockey goalie equipment, so our goalies would be much safer while playing this sport,” he wrote. “Students also will not have to worry about being hit by a puck.” Congratulations to both Boden and Tyr and their schools! February...

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Milk just got a whole lot cooler

Milk just got a whole lot cooler

Having cold milk (or milk that isn’t slushy with ice) at lunch would seem a given for school cafeterias, but because of aging equipment, some schools have struggled to do that. Recently, the Maine Dairy and Nutrition Council (MDNC) and its Fuel Up to Play 60 program, funded by Maine dairy farmers, awarded six Maine schools grant funds to purchase new milk coolers – Coastal Ridge in York, Center Drive School in Orrington, Ella P. Burr School in Lincoln, Beech Hill School in Otis, Edmunds Consolidated School in Edmunds Township, and Edna Drinkwater School in Northport. A large number of schools applied for the small equipment grants, far beyond what was available for funds, and the MDNC selected based on the most basic of needs – a working milk cooler. This fall, we have visited many of the schools during lunchtime to celebrate the new coolers. On Tuesday, Nov.8, we were at Edmunds Consolidated, which is a K-8 school. Cindy Cox, the school’s food service director, said the milk cooler was a much needed piece of equipment that the school would not have otherwise been able to afford. “Our other one would ice up, and I had to defrost it once a week,” she said. The school has no walk-in coolers, and the milk crates would take up too much room in the refrigerators.  “We only get a milk delivery once a week, so it all has to fit.” The new cooler solves the problem. Jane and Aaron Bell of nearby Tide Mill Organic Farm were also able to be at the school. Jane helped us hand out fun dairy stuff to the students (stickers, pencils and bracelets), while her son Aaron brought Arugula, a 3-week-old Lineback calf, for the students to meet during recess. Aaron told the students that Arugula will be two years old before she has her first calf and becomes a milk cow. Until then she will be hanging out on the farm and living a life much like them – “she has a lot of friends, has a nice place to live and eats lots of good food,” he said.               Our new dietetic intern Zakk got to make the trip to Edmunds with us, so we made sure to stop by Tide Mill Organic Farm because we always like to give future dietitians an opportunity to see where all that nutritious dairy starts out. If you’ve never been there, Tide Mill is located right on the water’s edge, just about as far east as you can go in the State of Maine. The cows have some of the most scenic pastures you’ll find in the state. The farm offers tours depending on the time of year, so be sure to check it out if you’re ever in that neck of the woods. The first Bell settled here in 1765 and built a grist mill powered by the tide (hence Tide Mill). One of the grist stones is still there, and you can see timbers that used to be part of the dam, now covered by seaweed.     The farm encompasses 1600 acres and is truly a diversified operation. While it has been a dairy farm for much of its history, the Bell’s actually stopped milking cows in 1977. “Someone was coming from New York to buy the herd of registered Brown Swiss when we were headed to the hospital to have Aaron,” Jane said. Ironically, it was Aaron, a member of the eighth generation on the farm, who wanted to bring milk cows back to the farm...

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